INDUSTRY INTEL

INDUSTRY INTEL

How well do you know the marketing industry? Do you need a way to take that paper from a “B” to an “A”, looking for a great topic for your blog, or a way to impress that recruiter? Our Marketing Intel links can help you to become a marketing whiz.

Marketing and Advertising News

  • AdAge: A publication focused on digital marketing and advertising including B2B, data, and digital marketing.
  • AdWeek: A popular publication looking at trends in marketing and advertising.
  • Digiday: A leading modern media publication and events company, a daily must-read among influencers obsessed with the bleeding edge of media and marketing.
  • TechCrunch: An advertising website focused on technology and startups.
  • Trend Hunter: The most popular collection of cutting edge ideas, fueled by 182,000 insatiably curious people.

Marketing Acronyms

Do you know what BR is? How about CRM, DM, GA, or SEO? There are so many acronyms in marketing and business. Check out some of the most common acronyms, and go here for the full detailed list:

BR – Bounce Rate.  The percentage of people who land on a page on your website and then leave without clicking on anything else or navigating to any other pages on your site.

CRM – Customer Relationship Management.  A set of software programs that lets companies keep track of everything they do with their existing and potential customers.

DM – Direct Mail.  The delivery of advertising material to recipients of postal mail; also called “junk mail” by its recipients. Direct mail is a dubious investment for most businesses.

GA – Google Analytics.  A service by Google that generates detailed statistics about a website’s traffic and traffic sources, and measures conversions and sales

SEO – Search Engine Optimization.  Techniques that help your website rank higher in organic search results, making your website more visible to people who are looking for your brand, product, or service via search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo.

What is SEO?


Networking

NETWORKING

Why is everybody talking about Networking? Because it works. Carlos, one of our program participants, said it best – “A year before I even graduated, I connected with a HR manager at Condé Nast and expressed my interest in the position, which I am sure helped in solidifying me as a potential candidate when I finally applied (and got the job!).”

It can also be scary putting yourself out there. Make it easier on yourself. Take that first step and prepare your “elevator speech”.

Watch this video form Howcast on how to perfect the elevator pitch.

Elevator Speech

If you had a minute to tell someone how awesome you are, could you do it? An elevator speech is a brief way to tell someone why they should be interested in learning more about you.  In other words, what makes you special. Bet your mom could do it for you… but she won’t be there so you have to.

To get started, write down some words or phrases that describe you (e.g. smart, good with numbers, great communicator). Think about how great you would be in a marketing internship or entry-level role. Then write your elevator speech. Practice using a mirror, and with others) until you are comfortable “giving” the speech. Always end your conversation by asking for a business card so you can follow-up and build your network.

Build your elevator speech and make it relevant to the company you are talking to:

Hi, my name is Rachel Smith. I will be graduating from XYZ University next year with a degree in Marketing and Psychology. I’m interested in exploring a marketing career. As vice president of the Marketing club, one of my main responsibilities is to manage our social media content and calendar. I develop daily social media outreach through Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and I also write our weekly blogs. I read that your company is expanding in digital and I’m looking for an internship where I can use my digital skills to benefit a company. Can I have your business card?


Marketing Readings

Marketing Readings

Classics and Featured Reading


The Long View: Career Strategies to Start Strong, Reach High, and Go Far
Brian Fetherstonhaugh
View on Amazon


Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay
Lester Wunderman
View on Amazon


Breakthrough Advertising
Eugene Schwartz
View on Amazon


Database Marketing
Robert C. Blattberg, Byung-Do Kim, Scott A. Neslin
View on Amazon


How to Write a Good Advertisement
Vic Schwab
View on Amazon


Mail Order Handbook
Richard Hodgson
View on Amazon


My Life in Advertising/Scientific Advertising
Claude Hopkins
View on Amazon


Ogilvy on Advertising
David Ogilvy
View on Amazon


Scientific Advertising
Claude Hopkins
View on Amazon


Successful Direct Marketing Methods
Bob Stone, Ron Jacobs
View on Amazon


Tested Advertising Methods
John Caples
View on Amazon



Interviewing

INTERVIEWING

You’ve networked, have a rock star cover letter and resume, and an interview tomorrow. Can’t get much better than this. Follow these tips to nail every interview, every time.

Check out the video:

5 Must-have Digital Marketing Skills To Get The Interview

You’ve networked, have a rock star cover letter and resume, and an interview tomorrow. Can’t get much better than this. Follow these tips to nail every interview, every time

  • Research the Company. Visit the website, who are the players, what’s their mission, what are they working on. Be ready to talk about some of this during the interview.
  • Read the Job Description. This is the answer key. This what they are looking for – can you do it? Have you done similar things in school, at your internships – tell them about it. Be ready to tell them why you are the one for this job.
  • Look the Part, Be on Time (we mean early). To suit or not to suit? Ask the recruiter or others you may know at the company what to wear. Make sure you know how to get there and arrive 15 minutes early. Running late, call. Not calling is not okay. You made it, turn the phone off…calls during the interview also not okay.
  • Interview Like a Boss. Relax, they already like you or you wouldn’t be here. Stand up, greet interviewer with a firm handshake. Make eye contact. Listen carefully (you can take notes too). Impress the recruiter with your insightful questions (prepare ahead of time) and ask a few questions about them as well.
  • Close the Deal. Thank the recruiter for their time. Ask about next steps and get a business card. (Ditto for everyone else you meet with.) Send individual thank yous same day, and try to add something specific to the conversation you had. If you really want to impress, send an old school, clearly legible, hand handwritten thank you.


Career Advice #5

CAREER ADVICE #5

Networking Trumps Resume Posting

Tim Carr, Chief Lifter, LIFT Agency

When I was looking for my first career opportunity after college, it took me a while to realize that job searching needs to go beyond a finely polished resume. Taking an active role in creating human connections and attending networking events will create more career opportunities than any anonymous job board application.

When asking for a meeting, be sure to emphasize you are seeking advice, not a jobThis is key! While a phone call works, face-to-face meetings are always more effective.

Some questions you should ask:

Don't be too picky by limiting yourself to just your "field."

  • What are the industry trends?
  • What types of jobs are available in the field?
  • What skills or personal characteristics contribute to success?

And always be sure to ask if there is anyone else you should speak with. These related introductions will open invaluable doors.

Be sure to send a follow-up note of appreciation, preferably handwritten.

Continue the cycle of informational interviews and before you know it, you will have a solid understanding of what it takes to succeed in a field. And more importantly, when someone has a new opportunity, you could be top of mind.

Career Advice #2

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

Career Advice #3

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. The big question is on which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Career Advice #1

What to Expect When You Transition from College to a Marketing Career


Career Advice #4

CAREER ADVICE #4

Finding Your Passion

Michael Becker, Co-founder & Managing Partner at The Connected Marketer Institute, an mCordis initiative

Finding your passion, and staying true to it, may very well be your life’s greatest personal achievement, for once you’ve found it you’ll have the roadmap, focus, energy and fortitude to accomplish nearly anything.

Some people have the passion to transform physical objects, like taking raw materials and creating a building.  Some people are driven to excel at sport, while others are chefs, doctors, fireman and engineers. Some have a passion to draw, mediate, practice Yoga, travel, garden, listen to music, take long walks or stomp in puddles.  Others have the passion to transform the mind and spirit through teaching.  And, like me, some have the passion for marketing and business, an increasingly complex social science that helps fulfill the needs of society and shape the world (as demonstrated by the recent launch of The Connected Marketer).

There are as many passions as there are people. Your passion is not a physical object, something that can be picked up off the ground and quietly slipped into your pocket, found in the back of a closet or tucked away in a safety deposit box for safe keeping.

Your passion is the essence of what makes you who you are. It defines you.  It is what you want to be. It is what you want to stand and be known for. It is an intangible, internal force that we already individually posses.  It is the source of your joy and the happiness that you can project and share with others. Your passion is a river of internal energy that you can access to power and propel you through life.  It will be the force behind your beliefs, intentions, thoughts, actions, and the results and contributions you make to society.

Your passion is not a passing fad, a temporary like or dislike. Your doctor cannot prescribe a passion to you.  Your parents cannot hand it down or tell you what it is or should be.  Your friends and colleagues cannot dictate it to you.  Although all these people and everyone and everything you encounter though life, either in person or virtually, can help you identify, refine and nurture it.

When I was five my mom suggested that I pay attention to what makes you happy and follow where it takes me.   So, I started selling rocks door to door and learned that I loved to sell and be with people. At eight I decided I wanted to be an international medical equipment sales representative (a long story), and at thirteen I recognized that I wanted to teach business and share my experiences.   Fortunately, I’ve been able to do all this and look to do so much more.   Immediately upon graduating from college I moved to Tokyo, Japan, and sold medical products to Western Europe.  Later I found myself working for and with companies throughout the world.   I’ve had the opportunity to start and run my own business, write articles and books, to teach (with a lot of support from Marketing EDGE) and support the growth of an entire global industry—mobile marketing.

I’ve been very fortunate and am grateful for all that I have accomplished and will.   Finding your passion starts with gratitude and requires a persistent and conscious effort.  You need to experiment with your life.  Go to school, read books, talk to everyone around you and while self-reflecting, listen and feel for those things that give you joy.   Once you identify these you can cultivate them and build pathways to access the energy that is produced by accessing your passion.

I readily admit, however, that this is so much easier said than done.  As you look to find and cultivate your passion you’ll find that you’re faced with many obstacles, fears, doubts and anxieties.  Success is found in the process of overcoming obstacles and not be being stopped by them.   You can find your passion; you just need to work at it.

Oh, and one last thing: It is also important to keep yourself physically and mentally healthy in order to find and retain your passion.   You need to exercise, eat right, take a break every once and a while and experience joy; otherwise, you won’t have the capacity to follow and fulfill your passion and provide your unique contribution to the world.  But if you stay healthy, stay true to your passion, practice and nurture your life/passion you can be a positive force in the world to all those you can encounter.  Good luck!

Career Advice #2

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

Career Advice #3

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. The big question is on which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Career Advice #5

Networking Trumps Resume Posting


Career Advice #3

CAREER ADVICE #3

Both Sides Now

Warren Hunter, Chairman, DMW Direct and Kent Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, Highlights for Children, Inc.

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. The big question is on which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Why I Love Being on the Client Side

- Kent Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, Highlights for Children, Inc.

One of the coolest things about the field of data-driven marketing is that there is such a broad range of jobs and industries involved.   Early on in your career it can be a challenge to figure it all out.  Here’s a confession: I am a CEO and I am still figuring it out.  The best thing is that whether you are well along in your career or just starting out, much of your success will come from being curious, from maintaining a desire to learn and an openness to change.  I work for Highlights for Children, Inc.  We are a diversified educational publisher.  Currently, we are most well-known for Highlights magazine and for being in the doctors’ and dentists’ waiting rooms. I love being part of something where we focus on serving our customer from beginning to end.  All of our teams have their own areas of focus.  But when we are at our best as a company, each person feels like they are part of something bigger than themselves, bigger than just their team. Our teams have to think things through from soup to nuts.  From ideation, to creation, to operation and execution, and all the way through to customer service.  If this sounds good, you might prefer the client side of the industry.

We get to go deep into thinking about our markets and customers, even as we have the excitement of bringing many different ideas and tools to bear as we serve those customers.  On the client side, you work in an environment where the whole team is focused on a customer or product segment with alignment and consistency.  This can be very rewarding, particularly if you already have a passion around those customers or around the products your company produces. I like the focus, the consistency, the feeling of being dedicated to the products, the mission, and the customer.

Life on the Agency Side

– Warren Hunter, Chairman, DMW Direct

I started my career on the client side working for a relatively modest company manufacturing office machines. In my final job on the client side, I had brought in several agencies to help our team accomplish our goals. However, in a short amount of time, one agency really “got it” and we were funneling all our work to them. It was then I realized that this was where the excitement was and I wanted to be a part of it. So, I joined that agency in 1988 and have been there ever since.

The pace in an agency is faster and the learning is continuous. Results are always in the cross hairs. This is not the 9-5 life you might have on the client side. This is delivering on whatever the client needs in the face of (sometimes) ridiculous time frames. This is life where you get to work with a number of different clients, different products, all of the off and online media — and where clients expect you to be the marketing expert, filling in the blanks for them.

This is the world of 24/7 availability. An east coast agency working with a west coast client (or vice versa) needs to have account people on extended hours to accommodate the time differences. I get email from our people at two in the morning as well as during the work day.

Depending on your constitution, this is where the excitement lives. After landing a new client, you have to come up a fast learning curve to know as much about their business as you possibly can. After all – they are coming to YOU for help.  The expectation is that you are a smart marketer – a smart ad person. And they expect you to understand their customers, their markets. If you go to work for a large agency with large clients you may only work on a single client (which is sort of like being the client). But in the world of mid-size agencies – everybody gets to work on everything – including more than one client in more than one industry. Fun? You bet. Hard work? Count on it.

Which Side is the RIGHT Side? – Kent and Warren

Of course, there is no right answer when thinking about starting out on your career path – either side can be the right side. You will figure out what’s best for you by trying roles in different companies over time, and that journey can provide you with great skills and experiences. Your goal now should be to find a job where you will be happy, where you will have a passion for what you are doing. A job on either side will provide you with many opportunities to learn. But across our industries, we need bright students like you to join the data-driven marketing field. It won’t take you long to figure out where you’d rather be. We look forward to working with you whatever side you choose.

Career Advice #2

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

Career Advice #4

Find Your Passion

Career Advice #5

Networking Trumps Resume Posting


Career Advice #2

CAREER ADVICE #2

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

Nicole Lombardo, Account Supervisor, kbs+

Whether it’s landing that first marketing internship, or finding a permanent full-time gig after college, now is an important time to kick off the search. There are a few key areas to keep in mind to position you in a smart way.

  1. Get in tune with yourself: You most likely have an idea of what you are looking for by now-the type of role or general industry. You want to pursue something that gets you excited, that you find intriguing, and something you have a real passion for. Be honest with yourself, and not too concerned with what others may think is best for you. You know yourself best.
  2. Network wisely: Be aware and attuned to conversations around you. You never know who may be sitting next to you on your next flight or in line at the coffee shop. Utilize both your personal and professional networks to continue conversations with people and always put your professional self out there.
  3. Use social media to your advantage: It’s important to have a professional and consistent presence in all your social media outlets-Facebook, twitter, LinkedIn. It’s the best way to promote your own personal brand. LinkedIn is a great way to research prospective companies and keep in touch with people you meet through in-person networking activities or webinars.  A smart introduction email and a descriptive branded profile detailing who you are, what you can offer and what you are looking for, can start that two-way dialogue that may lead to opportunities.
  4. Prep and follow-up: The actual introduction, phone call or interview is important, but what you do before and after can really cinch the deal. It is very important to do your homework on the organization and the prospective employees you plan on meeting. Knowing about the business will prepare you so to ask insightful questions and have a solid conversation. As always, a timely and professional follow up is imperative-a thoughtful thank you note goes a long way.
  5. Don’t limit yourself: Know what you want, but cast the net wide in the search. The more conversations you have with potential employers and people in your network, the more exposure to different companies and environments, and  the better you find out where you see yourself. You may be surprised that you like that modest office of 10 people over the large well-known corporation.

Good luck!

Career Advice #1

What to Expect When You Transition from College to a Marketing Career

Career Advice #3

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. The big question is on which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Career Advice #4

Find Your Passion


Career Advice #1

CAREER ADVICE #1

What to Expect When You Transition from College to a Marketing Career

Ben Kneller, Senior Marketing Manager, AT&T (formerly DirecTV)

The transition from college into an internship or job can be an exciting time, but it can also be a difficult and stressful time.  After going through this experience just a few short years ago, these are the biggest lessons I’ve learned from both job hunting and then my transition into the new position.

​Job Hunting

Don't be too picky by limiting yourself to just your "field."

Sure, there are a small percentage of students that are going to have multiple job offers and options after school, but for the overwhelming majority of students, it’s not easy to find a job in the field you want to pursue. Even if you did everything “right,” there’s not going to be a line of employers waiting for you at graduation. When applying to jobs, one thing to remember is not to limit yourself to opportunities that fall neatly into your experience or major.

Often times with entry level positions, employers are betting on the person, not their resume. There are countless stories of people going into a field other than what they went to school for and falling in love with a job they never imagined. Even if that doesn’t end up being the case for you, there are still valuable lessons you can learn from a different field that can apply to your next job back in the field you desire.

The take away from this is to keep an open mind and don’t narrow your focus too much when applying for jobs.

Transition to New Position

Don't assume you're working on "intern" projects.

Congratulations! Now that you got hired for an entry level position or internship, it’s important to never assume you’re working on “intern” projects or other work that may seem basic. Hopefully that’s not the case and you’ve been given meaningful assignments from the first day, but the majority of entry level positions are probably going to come with some work that is not that exciting.

The biggest mistake you can make is not giving your full effort towards every project that comes across your desk. Even if it’s the most basic request, your boss will notice the level of detail and effort that you put towards that task. Also keep in mind that you never know what that simple task may turn in to. You may uncover information or provide a new perspective on something that ends up evolving your project into something more substantial!

Career Advice #2

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

Career Advice #3

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. The big question is on which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Career Advice #4

Find Your Passion


Career Advice

You’re going to get some great advice about marketing here. These stories are short, to the point, and written by marketers, just for students.

How do you get the internship or job you want? Decide on working for a marketing agency or a company? Build your personal brand (be like Nike).

What to Expect When You Transition from College to a Marketing Career.

By Ben Kneller, Senior Marketing Manager, AT&T (formerly DirecTV) 

Five Steps for Landing a Job or Internship

By Nicole Lombardo, Account Supervisor, kbs+

So you want a career in advertising or marketing. Which side of the fence? Client side or agency side?

Warren Hunter, Chairman, DMW Direct and Kent Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, Highlights for Children, Inc.

Finding Your Passion

By Michael Becker, Co-founder & Managing Partner at The Connected Marketer Institute, an mCordis initiative

Networking Trumps Resume Posting

By Tim Carr, Chief Lifter, LIFT Agency